The Katering Kates get cracking on their first full-length TV series

The Kates Get Krack!n. Photo: Supplied

The Kates Get Krack!n. Photo: Supplied

The Katering Kates are in remarkably good spirits, all things considered. They’re at the tail end of 12 months’ hard slog on new series Get Krack!n, knee-deep in a publicity blitz and at least one of their children has been struck down with a fever.

But it’s their joint offspring that has the pair uneasy. Having made their name with a smash YouTube show, they’re about to debut their first full-length series on the ABC.

Kate McLennan (the blonde one) is confident.

“It’s a good show,” she says. “We did a screening a couple of weeks ago with a crowd. It was very nerve-racking.”

“I was fine,” Kate McCartney (the brunette) insists. “I was emotionally dead to it.”

In the new eight-part series, the pair abandon the core conceit behind The Katering Show – two friends making a foodie vlog, despite the fact one of them can’t stand food – and embark on new careers as breakfast TV presenters.

“We couldn’t keep writing about food,” McLennan says. “What was appealing about the breakfast format was the psychotic nature of it: going from covering a tragedy somewhere to discussing hair and cutting to a viral video.”

There’s no getting away from the simmering anger beneath the pratfalls and gags in Get Krack!n. Sexism, racism and the general Trumpian awfulness of the world in 2017 are all in the crosshairs. Parenthood is to blame, apparently.

“I was a bit close-minded up until the time I had a kid,” McCartney says. “My heart cracked open and now I can’t close it. I feel responsible for every living thing on the planet.”

McLennan agrees. “Since we had kids, our anger with the world has escalated,” she says.

They admit to having “lofty ideals” regarding diversity when it comes to the casting and the writing of the show. Keen to push outside the white middle-class confines of The Katering Show, they’ve tried to include the sort of people and faces Aussie telly (especially breakfast TV) often neglects. But none of that gets in the way of a good joke. The core of the show is still the offbeat, real-life chemistry between the leads and a healthy dose of self-mockery.

Kate McLennan and Kate McCartney. Photo: Scott McNaughton

Kate McLennan and Kate McCartney. Photo: Scott McNaughton

Do they each rely on the other to reveal what’s funny about themselves?

“The only thing I’ve ever noticed about you is that you have big teeth,” McCartney says. “What do you notice about me?”

McLennan looks vaguely panicked. “Positive? I’m not sure I should get into this. We write our own insults. If McCartney is saying something horrible to me, it’s something I’ve written and vice versa. Nobody’s going to hate you as much as you hate yourself.”

However, they did ask one of their new writers, Michelle Law, to inventing a few insults.

“She did and it was really upsetting, actually,” McLennan says.

McCartney nods, deadpan. “It really hurt. And we fired her.”

Despite having made the leap from YouTube stars to ABC TV personalities, there’s no sign of the pair being spoiled by success. For one thing, they’ve been too busy to enjoy it – alongside Get Krack!n, they’ve been working on a sitcom and a new, as-yet-untitled, project. And, as McCartney says, parenthood tends to trump any newfound celebrity glamour.

“You might have the most incredible experience on set but you go home and your kid spews on you.”

Get Krack!n starts Wednesday, August 30, 9.30pm, on ABC, abc.net.au

 

 

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