The Hit List: best of the new releases May 17-23, 2017

Casey Affleck in Manchester by the Sea. Photo: Supplied

Casey Affleck in Manchester by the Sea. Photo: Supplied

WATCH

Lee is living a miserable existence doing odd jobs when he’s summoned back to his Massachusetts seaside town. His brother has died, entrusting him with the care of his teenage nephew. But there are other, worse ghosts waiting. This extraordinarily powerful drama manages the rare trick of balancing horrific darkness against absurd humour, refusing to pander to sensationalism or to sink into the icy bleakness of its landscape. Casey Affleck delivers a terrific performance as a man whose soul has been torched.

READ

  • Depends What You Mean By Extremist by John Safran
  • Penguin, $34.99
  • johnsafran.com

John Safran’s new book opens with a clash of two rallies in Melbourne’s Fed Square. On one side are the anti-Islamic bunch, on the other, the anti-anti-Islamic rally. It’s pretty much a microcosm for current global politics, two sides shouting at each other with no apparent common ground. But John is inspired to push into the dark heart of Australian extremism, left and right. The picture it paints isn’t pretty, but this is a surprisingly enjoyable slice of gonzo journalism, delivered with a deadpan humour.

Photo: Supplied

Photo: Supplied

HEAR

This Melbourne multi-instrumentalist duo began busking in Bourke Street. Since then they’ve exploded onto the international scene, selling out gigs across Europe and Canada. The Records Were Ours is the first in a trilogy of EPs, offering a taster of their snappy folk-pop. The title track is the sort of classic Aussie songwriting Paul Kelly trademarked, while new single Take Me Out is a bluesy stomp, recalling Kings of Leon with just a dash of Boy and Bear.

Image: Supplied

Image: Supplied

PODCAST

The internet allows us all to feel like experts, but this podcast seeks to remind us we have no idea how little we know. There’s something comforting – and kind of inclusive – in host David McRaney’s exploration of human irrationality. In a divided age, it seems we all have self-delusion in common. Start with a fascinating run of three episode where he examines the Backfire Effect, the psychological process whereby we reject any facts that threaten our tightly held beliefs.

Image: Supplied

Image: Supplied

WIN!

Thanks to Universal Sony Home Entertainment, we have 10 Blu-Rays of Manchester By The Sea to be won.

Go to theweeklyreview.com.au/competitions/ and leave a comment identifying the album reviewed in this week’s mag. Closes midnight Sunday, May 21.

giveaway-manchester-by-the-sea_bd-uv-3d

 

 

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