Music & movement for youngsters at The Rhythm Tree

The Rhythm Tree. Photo: supplied

The Rhythm Tree. Photo: supplied

The Rhythm Tree

 

The promise

The Rhythm Tree is an award-winning music and movement class for babies, toddlers and preschoolers – and the adults in their lives.

It’s based on the premise that music is a basic life skill and all children are musical and can learn to keep a beat, hold a tune and be part of music-making.

My little one may be the world’s youngest Belieber, and I’m keen to encourage his musical growth.

The reality

The little guy and I sit on the floor in a circle with other parents and kids. Our teacher, Juliane, starts with a greeting song and we’re encouraged to join in, welcoming each person by name to the class.

We then move through a range of songs, each accompanied by different movements, activities, repetitions and contributions from us.

My boy looks slightly baffled but as the class moves through melodies and lyrics, he warms to it and before we know it we’re all dancing, shaking miniature instruments and singing.

Juliane could walk straight into a job on Play School. She makes jumping around saying “gooly gooly” and waving her arms look almost dignified. She tells us the classes encourage families to make music a part of their daily lives.

Photo: supplied

Photo: supplied

The pay-off

The class is a wonderful way to show parents how to bring music into our lives and to bond with our kids through music.

The pain factor

You may have to leave your self-consciousness at the door.

Who should do it?

Anyone with kids up to five years old.

The bill

It’s $235 for a nine-week term, including a song book and CD.

Would I do it again?

I’m looking at enrolling for the term now.

Photo: supplied

Photo: supplied

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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