6 ways to save money and stay healthy

Photo: supplied.

Photo: supplied.

The saying, “your health is not an expense, it’s an investment”, is often received with an eye roll or sarcastic remark. And you know what? I get it. The reality is: this is one statement you need to experience to understand. So, with this in mind, I want you to make some simple changes that are listed below and I promise you will realise that getting in shape doesn’t have to be expensive.

1. Limit takeaway to once a week
When you’re tired after a long day at work, sometimes ordering that burger on Uber Eats feels like the only option for dinner. I understand – when it’s as easy as clicking a button and sitting on the couch to wait for your food to arrive, it’s a seriously tempting option. However, when you’re doing this from Monday to Friday, not only will your waistline pay the price but your wallet will, too. Try to limit your takeaway orders to once a week and stick to this by planning your meals, packing your lunch for work each day and freezing any meals in advance that you can easily chuck in the microwave in your time of need.

2. Fresh is best
Whenever I’m asked what my No.1 nutrition tip is, I can never go past sticking to real food. Try to buy fresh and unpackaged fruit and veggies when possible and avoid any pre-made meals – these are always more expensive than cooking with the real deal. Think about sticking to the outside aisles of the supermarket; this will not only save you money but will force you to cook with real and delicious ingredients.

3. Stick to your shopping list
Chucking those extra (often unnecessary) items in your trolley will always make your receipt that much longer. Try to plan your meals for the week and hit the shops with a list of ingredients you need. My tip is never go shopping on an empty stomach – that Snickers at the checkout always look so much more appealing when you’re starving. If this is an area where you will struggle, don’t shop when you’re hungry, try not to take the kids and give online shopping a try.

The right approach, and you'll be growing your own veggies year round.

The right approach, and you’ll be growing your own veggies year round.

4. Grow your own
I know that this might seem like an extreme step. However, growing your own fruit, veggies, herbs or spices can save you money, it takes less time and space than you might realise and it can be very therapeutic and rewarding. The advice I always give to clients is just start with a herb garden and see how you go. Trust me: nothing on Earth will taste more delicious than your homegrown produce.

5. Buy in bulk
Don’t worry – I don’t mean everything; I’m talking about the staples. These are the things with long expiration dates that are typically going to be part of your weekly meals and easy to store at home; so keep an eye out for any specials on long-life staples such as quinoa, brown rice, tuna and nuts.

6. Write it all down
Grab a pen and write down everything that you spend on food (and I mean everything) and highlight anything purchased outside of the supermarket, excluding your one coffee a day. Are there excessive funds spent on alcohol, extra coffees and snacks? The answer is often “yes”. This an awesome way to realise how much you’re spending on stuff you don’t need.

At the end of the day, buying fresh ingredients, cooking real food and eating well doesn’t mean you have to break the bank. In fact, cutting down on junk food and takeaway and taking care of yourself will keep you healthy in the long run and can help you avoid any nasty health-associated costs further down the track.

28bysamwood.com

Recommended

June movie picks

June movie picks

Rhett Bartlett
Dali delights

Dali delights

Mary O'Brien
TWR's book club

TWR's book club

Michael Rowland
Best Aussie podcasts

Best Aussie podcasts

Erin Munro
Talkin' 'Bout Robyn

Talkin' 'Bout Robyn

Meg Crawford