What’s in and what’s out for interiors in 2018

A touch of warmth. Design: Sisalla Interior Design. Photo: Eve Wilson

A touch of warmth. Design: Sisalla Interior Design. Photo: Eve Wilson

Terrazzo, brown and … shower curtains? Even the most dedicated home-interior enthusiasts might be surprised to learn what’s on the cards trend-wise in 2018.

We asked some leading industry names what residential trends they predict will be in (and out) in the coming months.

 

What’s in

/ Brown

In line with the recent return of 1970s tones to interiors, industry insiders say the new go-to neutral colour for 2018 will be brown. “It may seem hard to accept, but brown is coming … Brown is warm, welcoming and inviting, which makes it a long-awaited change from cold and depressing grey,” says Lauren Li of Sisalla Interior Design.

/ New nudes

The new nudes. Photo: Temple & Webster

The new nudes. Photo: Temple & Webster

A series of earthy red and pink-toned nude shades are also set to become fashionable neutral colours.

“Pink finally will be seen as a neutral. Paired with leathers and dark moody accents to ground it, the sugar-puff millennial pink version of it will make way for an earthier, more sophisticated hue,” says senior stylist Jessica Bellef.

/ Terrazzo

Without a doubt, the new “it” material replacing marble and concrete in 2018 is terrazzo. Most commonly seen on tiles, the look of this ancient material is making its way into furniture on side tables and on accessories from planters to rugs.

/ Rich colour

After a few years of monochrome, pastel and Scandi-themed homes, rich colour is finally making a comeback.

“Clients are becoming more open to braver choices as we guide them towards a more dynamic aesthetic; still timeless, yet perhaps more adventurous than pastels that have defined recent times,” says principal Alex Hopkins.

/ Sanctuary bathrooms

A private retreat. Design: Studio Tate. Photo by Sharyn Cairns

A private retreat. Design: Studio Tate. Photo by Sharyn Cairns

Once luxury extras, such as custom dressing tables, are becoming must-have features.

“These touches enhance the feeling of a private retreat and bring a layer of luxury to the everyday experience and everyday rituals,” Hopkins says.

/ ’80s hangover

The combination of muted romantic colour palettes and clean lines in residential interiors evokes “1990s minimalism, with a slight 1980s hangover”, says Bellef. A number of looks from this period are making a resurgence, such as bold-coloured carpet, corner bathtubs and shower curtains.

“Soft mauve, faded indigos and peachy terracotta will feature, as will tubular steel furniture and exaggerated sculptural decor. Bonus points for soft focus lighting,” Bellef says.

 

What’s out

/ All-white rooms

Given the predictions of colour, it comes as little surprise that the all-white look is set to go. Nearly every expert we spoke to was quick to proclaim the end of all-white bathrooms and kitchens.

“We’ve lived with white kitchens for a while now in the belief that white is safe and doesn’t date. But they’ve left us feeling nothing, so now we’re craving some warmth and colour,” Li says.

All-grey kitchens and bathrooms are also predicted to suffer a similar fate.

/ Downlights

Instead of downlights throughout the entire home, consider a varied approach to lighting in living areas and bedrooms.

“Floor and table lamps, pendants, wall sconces and sculptural lighting have both functional and aesthetic impact far greater than anything downlights can achieve,” Hopkins says.

/ Brass

In 2017, it was rose gold. In 2018, the trendy material to avoid is brass.

“I am cautioning my clients to stay away from brass – it is everywhere. It is the one material which will date-stamp a renovation to the 2010s,” says Kate Challis of of Kate Challis Interiors.

 

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